Necatuss

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Necatuss

“The SUBPAC is great for helping me tune kicks them and get them pumping just right so when this track is performed I know somebody is going to groove to it.”

 


Q&A with Necatuss about the SUBPAC:

What role does “feeling” play in the music you make and love?
Bass Is hugely important to telling a story. It physically affects your body in some dramatic ways. For example 18 hz is the frequency that some scientist claim to be the resonate tone of your eyeballs, causing visual hallucinations to happen. While anywhere between 1-30 hz can cause voice modulations and shortness of breath. This all can cause feelings of anxiety or euphoria depending on the tone, duration and amplitude. This is greatly important to getting people to feel something in a composition and SUBPAC helps give you an idea of how it’s actually going to work in a space.

Has the SUBPAC changed the way you create, produce or mix music?
I’ve noticed it has allowed me to focus on the bass less because I can “hear” it more. Especially when mixing in headphones since they have a harder time producing those low ends(This usually leads to too much bass in a track,) the subpac allows me to hear them when my headphones may not. Because of this, I can get more dynamics in my bass, more subtleties, and not just a bass on/off setup.

How could “physical audio” change our relationship to sound and music in the future?
I’m personally, REALLY interested in how this is going to be used outside of production. How are we going to incorporate this technology into our daily lives and into the concert set ups. I can already see things start to happen with SUBPAC’s “HARD OF HEARING” program. This is great being that music could be seen as a very ableist thing to those who are hard of hearing and giving them a chance to experience it in some form is something I can agree with. Music and Art should not just be for those who can hear. I can’t wait to see what you all do next with this, Maybe some way to incorporate this into theatres, video game systems, or even using it as a form of vibration cancellation for concert venues!

What excited you about the Feel SUBPAC project?
The diversity in the Artists. I love how it’s not just dubstep producers but a whole range of artists that utilize sound in some meaningful way. I can’t wait to see you all explore more with this and push this even further outside the contexts of music producers. A wide array of people could utilize such tech to create!

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ABOUT Necatuss:

Necatuss is the Chicago – based experimental electronic artist blending the worlds of contemporary sound art and new media with cinematic bass music. He is knowlageable in a wide array of techniques in sound; from hardware to software, foley to sound design, recording to production. His work is strongly influenced by a wide array of other styles, genres and artists; from the 50’s Swing, Hot Jazz, Soundtracks, Musique Concrete and so much more.
 Being that he was born in 1996, Necatuss is already making some major moves in the industry. Getting recognition from some big names and getting a write up on Nest Hq with his Debut Ep “Refraction,” is only the start for this young artist. Currently he is studying sound art at the prestigious School of The Art Institute of Chicago as a First-Year Scholars student. You may not heard much of him now, but he is sure to stir the pot and make a name for himself soon.